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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 106 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the schoolkill center and peggy executive director of west harlem environmental education. so nice to have all of you at the table. folks who follow the story know the second part of the story is that the president is deposed by a military coup last year in 2012. the thing i love and hate about that story is yep, that's exactly the problem. we can't make big, sustainable international green policy because we are fighting, literally fighting over islands sinking into the ocean. here, too, we are continuing to fight over all these policy questions and politics questions and missing the big story, the big story that is affecting all of us. is there any way to get us refocused on international inner generational, sustainable and international? >> climate change. we all have skin and neck in it. polls show 49% of americans believe that climate change is occurring and that people have caused it. 24% say it's climate change, but not from people. i'm not sure what science people are waiting for at this point. there's so much more science in and more coming in all the time. none theless, it was great t
structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is educated to their full potential? i know helping the state economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. but can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed , and buffalo, and syracuse, and albany. i know women have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historical. i know it is difficult. if it can you imagines what the society could achieve when our women fully participate as equal partners in ev
, entrepreneurial group of business men and women, scientists, educators and workers on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro- wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across- the-board effort led to the re- opening of the paper mill last year, putting 175 people back to work making 100% recycled paper. i had this to say about washington. innovation is in our genes. [applause] we create. we invent. we build. so now we must go forward, with both high ambition and a recognition that the power of innovation will fuel the next wave of job growth in washington. make no mistake, our top priority today, tomorrow, and every day for the next four years, is jobs. we must build a working washington, capable of sustained economic leadership in a rapidly changing world. my plan focuses on job growth in seven industry clusters. aerospace, life sciences, military, agr
sentence. >> that is a concept -- anyway, legislation will be critical. part of our job is to educate congress on what is going on out there. educate the public. we say cyber and everybody's eyes glaze over. i can see it. nonetheless, the call is here. we need to deal with this urgently and imminently because attacks are coming all the time from different sources and take different forms. they are increasing in seriousness and sophistication. >> you mentioned civilian space. there is defense space, the government space than dot com and dot org. that is the civilian space and the overwhelming majority of space. a lot of our temperature is operated by the private sector -- a lot of our infrastructure is operated by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- tha
, and any of you who doubt the power of public education, it is great, i can tell you that. we raise her family and a century-old farmhouse in the yakima valley. i'd also like you to meet my three boys and their families, connor, joe, jack and his wife megan, our grandson brody, and the newest inslee, zoe ann. [applause] this is a very special day for my family. all of our elected families. and this is a very special time for many other families in our state for this reason. people all across washington stood up for fairness and family in approving marriage equality last november. we should all be proud. [applause] we should all be proud. the vote on referendum 74 represents the best of who we are as a state. it should be an inspiration for the progress we can make, always towards equality, always towards fairness, always towards justice all across the state of washington. it has been an amazing journey over the past year and a half, as i've traveled to all corners of the state. i am a 5th generation son of the state of washington, and am proud to have roots in this state that are as wid
liberal education system as well as a very liberal media in general. my expectation with kids coming out of high school or college this sort of seem to think the government just passed the money and gives it out. if they don't seem to realize until much later in life that they're taking my money and giving it out. so i think it's an educational problem, much deeper than whether a candidate is running in a particular town. thanks for c-span. host: peter, thanks for the call. guest: conservatives have a lot of work to do in the media and in education. the media situation is a lot more balanced than 20 years ago or 30 years ago. a couple of major newspapers and magazines have collapsed. young people can access a ton of points of view and a lot of data and information and that is a healthy thing. people complain about the internet and all of these blogs and what happened to the good old days when you had serious editors manning the phones? i think the current situation is much healthier for a vigorous democracy and there's a lot of good stuff out there. if we have a piece on our website, a w
and celebrate it because it's the bedrock of our country's success. on education, the president of the united states has an opportunity to strengthen our classrooms and recommit to public education in this country, our teachers, so we can compete in a global market. now, for the republicans, they have vilified all of these institutions. they think that tax cuts for the wealthy and deregulation is exactly how we should run the country, and that's it. president obama actually accomplished a heck of a lot in his first term. but there is so much more he can do on a number of important issues facing our country in the second term. we are a center-left country. we are progressive. progressives are in the majority. we have to think like that as a movement. we have to think like that as a people. and the chatter across the street, we learned one thing about those folks during the 2012 election. they lie. they do a pretty good job of it. so when we start going down the road of immigration reform and climate change and fair taxation and public education, we'll get plenty of lies from the right, because
. then there is everything else, food, education, infrastructure, everything else the federal government does. ryan doesn't really say exactly which programs he is really cutting here. but it is where he is cutting. he gets four and a half times this budget as he does from medicare. it is about half the total cuts and it is a huge cut. we don't know the programs that will get the axe, but he has given us enough detail on it, to say that about two thirds of ryan's budget cuts comes from programs for the poor. but that is quite a bit. and he is still not balancing the budget until 2038. so how is ryan going to take the budget, which is already pretty rough and has pretty unpopular policies in it and get it to balance in ten years as opposed to 30? ironically, one thing that actually helps him a lot is the fiscal cliff deal, baecause it actually raises taxes. here is his explanation. >> all right, can you get to balance in ten years and not raise revenues? >> yes, yes, the revenue baseline is obviously higher now that we have this cliff behind us. >> i want you to listen to that again. they asked paul ryan,
. manufacturers have barbershops that supply them and local cafeter cafeterias. to educate communities around the world that this is vital for job growth because we have a jobs crisis today, ali, and manufacturing is the solution space for the jobs crisis. >> so, andrew liveris talking about job creation. the theme of dynamism has emerged over the course of the week here to jobs. >> i came here thinking they were absolutely stark-raving mad with resilient dynamism. now i'm starring to think it was a stroke of genius because it's allowed everybody to grab onto something and that developed into the theme jobs. >> well, listen, a few long working days here at davos. we've interviewed a lot of people, attended a lot of sessions. some of the best work is done just in the hallway having conversations with people. but this is a beautiful place and a pretty fun place to be. there are a lot of [ indiscernible ]s and parties and of course the skiing. richard, before we got started, hit the slopes. but being the true journalist that he is, you asked people how they were feeling about the economy. what d
concerned about, people are concerned about health care costs and education costs. and to a lesser extent, when economic growth is stronger as it was later in the bush years maybe they're concerned about issues related to the bottom and so. education and health care and sort of the broader challenge of globalization, those things loom incredibly large and the republican imagination and those are not issues republicans like to talk about. this is where compassion conservatism didn't emerge any backing to emerge in the late 1990s from a period when bill clinton had been something republicans up and down washington for four, six years. and the whole point of bush's him was to craft a republican party that had something to say about education. that's something to say about health care. you can go back and said, i think justifiably, that something like the prescription drugs bill was too big, cost too much, should've bee been paid fn someone been paid for and so wanted you to make similar critiques with no child left behind by the republican party will never get back to the wilderness if it ju
that we protect children, but we also need to extend that obviously to higher education. what chris said was well-said which is that campuses should be a place where a student like the one on that phone call should be able to go and study english and not worry about having to dive under her desk or, you know, behind corners of the building to avoid getting injured seriously. so, you know, i'm on the education and workforce committee. we actually just met this afternoon. the chairman of the committee, mr. klein from minnesota, a republican, made a pledge that we are going to be holding hearings on school violence, and, you know, i'm trying to be an optimist that, you know, the president's words yesterday, the willingness in the house to actually have these issues brought up for consideration, are going to produce some real results that will make this a safer country. >> because this is a public health problem, isn't it? i mean, gun violence is, you know, no less significant in its impact than public health issues like obesity in this country. i mean, this is just out of control, isn't it?
how we can better use those resources not only to support public endeavors like education and public safety and roads, but also of money that could be pumped into the private sector. >> david, if you have another question or comment, we are almost at the end of our time. but we can squeeze one -- ok. i think we have not at all exhausted this topic. we may have exhausted our panelists and some of you. we will return to its. this has been -- at least for a poor country lawyer, a very enlightening discussion of the economic issues. we've not done too much with the politics. i suppose there might be a smidgen of that in some of the decisions that get made over the next month's. let me take this occasion to thank you for a plethora of wonderful questions and for hanging in there in a very difficult topic. think our friends at the commonwealth fund for not only provided us -- thank our friends at the commonwealth fund for not only providing us this topic, but great direction in shaping this program. i would like you to think -- join me in thanking our panel for a terrific discussion. [appl
of education, research and development, innovation energy. there are things we can do about it but we have to do them together as a country. that's our goal. >> i do think it's important to put in context and remember just how dark the days were four years ago and how in the middle of that meltdown, people were thinking about going to caves and getting spam and guns. it was dark. not only the president, but the president working with george w. bush and others really pitched in and had to make very tough decisions and a lot of hard votes that got a lot of people unelected from office to get us through that. >> when we got our first economic briefings, i wanted to get some spam and go into a cave. i know what you're talking about. >> that's why this is such an opportunity, though, for the president right now. the problems we're talking about are structural. they've been there for a long time. this declining middle class has gone on for two decades. it isn't just the recession. that means investing. this is where the problem of the debt comes in. if you're going to get bet
. i have worked with republican governors to pass balanced budget while protecting of education and vital health care programs. it's really the same principled debate that's happening here, how to balance the budget but do it in ways that are responsible and that protect the middle class, that protect medicare and social security, but also reached across the aisle and do it in ways that are constructive and that allowance to reach compromise together. host: you mentioned your service in the state legislature in nevada. why come to washington? what can you do differently than you can back home? guest: our legislature in nevada is a citizens legislature. we met every other year. in addition to being a legislator, i work full time. i'm husband and father of three. this gives me an opportunity to serve my constituents 100% of the time. extremely humbling and honoring experience to be here. host: the debt ceiling vote, scheduled to see that happen today. how do you plan to vote? and once your opinion? guest: we really need a longer- term policy that allows greater certainty particula
, cutting educational programs. that's the one that balances in 2040. so what do you think a budget that balances in ten years from now is going to look like compared to that? obviously much worse. we're talking about cuts of up to 37% in government services as he know them, and, remember, you can't get a penny for these budgets from revenue. it all has to come from spending cuts, and the number i just cited takes social security, medicare, and defense off the table as they've stated. so we're talking about far deeper cuts than the ryan budget that you and i have bemoaned many a time here. >> so we're talking, okay, jared, about a 37% across the board cut. >> right. >> now, what was it about last year's election results that have led paul ryan to believe that he wasn't brutal enough the first time with the economy? >> exactly. this is the classical doubling down that i got to say at this point i am just -- maybe i should stop, but i'm just scratching my head over this. the election decisively was over this very argument about the role of government in people's lives. i actually thou
to try to educate our youth about the responsibility of using a firearm, the dangers of using a firearm? >> yeah. in a true way, to educate young people about both the responsibility and the true dangers, that's not a bad thing. what is a bad thing is blatantly marketing these guns to young people. basically it exposes the true colors of the gun lobby. they're not concerned in the gun industry. they're not concerned about the prevention of gun violence. they're just concerned about selling more guns. the rest of the american public wants to engage in a meaningful conversation about exactly what you're saying. what we can do respectful of the second amendment right to own guns, respectful of the fact that hunting and target shooting and protection are deeply ingrained notions. and, you know, in a lot of our country. but have that conversation simultaneous to the risks associated with having guns in the home and what we can do to prevent tragedies. >> sure. the tragedy that is most fresh on everyone's mind, newtown. right now there's a hearing under way in connecticut about stopping gun v
individuals who are educated in our universities receiving masters and ph.d.s to be able to stay here. and that's a good thing. too many research facilities are being set up by microsoft in canada or elsewhere rather than doing it here simply because they can't find workers. >> i call it brainiacs, the resolution, and i think it's very important. let me ask you about this, in terms of the house, and probably in terms of the senate too, what about the security? what kind of border security. we've made a lot of investments, what more will be in this bill? >> well, for the first time you have real triggers here. some people concerned about granting citizenship. and let me tell you, the path to citizenship is a long and arduous one. it's not amnesty. amnesty, i think the best definition is cutting in line people who are able to access a path to citizenship won't be able to cut in line. but another step that will need to be taken, there's going to be a commission in this bill comprised of governors and attorneys general and border state community members who have to sign off the certain bo
education and mobilization project state by state to let legislators know they can't continue to do this without paying a price. >> john: i wonder if they read today's poll results. in your column today you wrote that we don't live in a roe world, we live in a casey world. could you explain what you mean by that and how that really empowers conservative legislatures to pass these kind of laws? >> all of the restrictions that terry referred to, the door to them was opened in the 1992 decision planned parenthood versus casey which celebrated its own anniversary last year and while people were happy that that didn't overturn roe v. wade which was the fear at the time, what happened was they said you could basically pass any kind of restriction on abortion as long as it didn't outright ban it before viability. as a result, anything the court doesn't consider an undue burden can stand. that's basically out how federal counties which as you know, are stacked with many conservatives and obama has not made a ton of judicial appointments to them, these are the courts -- what is considered a
the people looking for those jobs. i would dramatically expand the education, particularly the science, technology, engineering , and mathematics education at all levels. that is something i would do. provide additional scholarships, bring in the foreign students to come here and want to stay here and work. we're educating them, they're going back. they're competing with countries and companies that are direct competitors, and we will let them work here. this is insane. cheryl: a lot more to say about this topic, and i will be looking for your writing on it. thank you. >> you're very welcome. cheryl: paul ryan was accused of throwing granny off the cliff. remember this? wait until you hear what critics are saying republicans are throwing every one of the cliff. ♪ ♪ cheryl: republicans saying their new budget will cut more than paul ryan. rembrandt democrats reacted to that one? well, we are hearing this one has been even matter. my next guest says that these cuts are not nearly what it's going to take to fix the mess that we're in. wall street legend. and to you first to my want to
it is dollars. meanwhile let us republicans feature the successed of child sentered education solutions, education solutions where the dollars follow the child. [applause] these are but a few examples of the way we must fight the battle or how we must win the argument. one thing we've got to get straight right now washington has spent a generation trying to bribe our citizens and extort our states. as republicans it's time to quit arguing around the edges of this corrupt system. that brings me to my third point which i want to shift gears and speak to changes i believe we must make if we are to win elections. as i ipped kated before i do not believe we need to abandon or change our principles. i know this observation disappoints many of our friends in the national media of course. for those in the national media that means supporting abortion on demand without policy. that means abandoning traditional marriage. for them real change means agreing to higher taxes every year to pay for government expanse and real change means engorsing the lightened policies of european social lism. that i
of us. they work across the aisle when possible and expand opportunity through education reform. i cannot wait to see what they can accomplish this year. when you take stock of all of this, it might seem you right now, but it will grow. as the president implement his agenda, it won't be pretty. at that moment, we will be ready. we will offer an alternative vision. we will explain how our vision differs and how it rests on vibrant communities and increases upward mobility. we will show how we can govern better by governing closer to the people and strengthening families and their livelihoods. we will make it clear that we have better ideas to combat poverty. our policies will lift everyone in this country. we will translate that vision into a governing agenda. that is how you offer enduring solutions. we will say to the country, here is our plan for the country, for the budget, for healthcare, for energy, defense. when we do that, we put our plans out against the president's results, i think we will compare quite favorably. we will win back the trust of the american people and put o
to action. 26 beautiful people, 20 wonderful babies and courageous teachers and educators would be alive today. >> are you where we thought we would be in this country with regards to the public debate that is going on right now since newtown, connecticut? >> the public debate on gun violence prevention has always been fraught with controversy. and i am encouraged by many of my colleagues who have been staunch opponents of any measures in the past who say we really need to do something about the guns. and that is the -- >> did you think that by now -- 20 first graders killed, six teachers killed and there was this tremendous mood in this country. a lot of people talked about wanting to do something. and now it seems as if once again the devil's in the details and the political will has subsided. one point to make very clearly is there rights to possess firearms. the second amendment has been reaffirmed to provide for a right to possess firearms. on marketing and promotion, gun ownership and responsible shooting and hunting ought to be encouraged and promoted. and nothing i say about prom
of this over a period of years. and her goal is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. it's very much in its time that we can teach people certain skills. >> the dark side of the personal finances industry saturday night at 10:00 on afterwards on c-span2. and look for more book tv online. like us on facebook. >> but i think it's all an evolutionary process. you grow into this role. and my sense is that you never get comfortable if you are always pushing for change and growth, not just in yourself but in the issues that you care about. you're never done. so there is never a point in time where you feel like i am now here and i can do this the same way all the time. it's always changing. it's changes given the state of the country and you don't know what those are going to be from one day to the next. so you have to be flexible and open to involve. >> the first ladies their public and private lives. >> c-span is teaming up for a series for television, first ladies influence and image airing over two seasons. season one begins president's day at 9:00 eastern
is undecided about her pregnancy, she's educated about all the options available to her. the knowledge that a pregnancy center can provide her, with the help she needs during pregnancy and after she needs the baby -- she has the baby, often makes the difference between life and death of the child in her womb. regardless of the mistakes she may have made in her life or the decisions she makes for her future, she is treated with love and respect. i commend and i thank god for the thousands of staff and volunteers at pregnancy resource centers all over this nation. we are a very bright light in the midst of a dark state of affairs. with god's help, we will prevail. [applause] i would like to leave you with a verse from the old testament. it is from genesis chapter 50. it has sustained me and it has given me hope. you intended to harm me, but god intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done, the saving of many lives in many ways. god bless you all, and thank you. [applause] [chanting u.s.a.] >> nellie, we made it. thank you for your prayers up there. thank you all for being he
. ♪ >>> this morning we come together to hear about the president's plans to strengthen education. >> today's flashback takes us back to 1998 at an event that started out pretty much like any other white house news conference, but it turned out to be anything but normal. when president clinton made a statement about his new education initiative and then on his own launched into one of the most infamous presidential lines ever uttered. >> i have to go back to work on my state of the union speech and i worked on it pretty late last night, but i want to say one thing to the american people. i want you to listen to me. i'm going to say this again. i did not have sexual relations with that woman, miss lewinsky. i never told anybody to lie, nota single time, ever. these allegations are false, and i need to go back to work for the american people. thank you. >> you almost forgot the conviction with which he said it. the next night clinton went to capitol hill to deliver that state of the union address with no mention whatsoever of the sex scandal that was consuming his presidency. it would take until december
, but you have an opportunity of society, education reform, economic growth, so that people can get on their feet and make the most of their lives and reach their potential. and that's what we're worried about losing in this country. >> one more on the budget. then a couple of other things. do you think there's a failure to get to know each other in washington, really get to know each other? you haven't had much contact with the president over the last couple of years. somebody pointed out to me something i thought was smart, which was solving the problem on the budget is not complicated. winning politically and solving the problem, that's hard. and that's what both sides seem to be locked into trying to do. >> well, i don't think that the president thinks we actually have a fiscal crisis. he's been reportedly saying to our leaders that we don't have a spending problem. we have a health care problem. that leads me to conclude he just thinks we ought to have more government-run health care and rationing. i don't think that's going to work. so there are a lot of democrats that are goo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 106 (some duplicates have been removed)